Volvo’s XC40 Recharge Pure Electric

Volvo XC40 Recharge Pure Electric available to order now amid surging interest in battery-powered cars

  • The first of five electric Volvo cars to be launched in the next five years
  • Capable of more than 249 miles on a single charge, versus average UK daily drive distance of 30 miles
  • Fast-charging potential: 80% of capacity in 40 minutes
  • Will deliver running-cost savings and tax benefits typical of electric cars
  • First Volvo to include pioneering Google Android-powered infotainment system
  • No internal combustion engine means extra storage space
  • One of the safest cars on the road
  • Launch expands Volvo’s already market-leading range of plug-in vehicles
  • XC40 Recharge Pure Electric P8 available from £53,155
  • UK deliveries anticipated from early 2021
Volvo XC40 Recharge Plug-in Hybrid

The Volvo XC40 Recharge Pure Electric – Volvo’s first all-electric car – is now available for UK customers to order.

The first of five fully electric cars to be launched by the Swedish company over the next five years, the XC40 Recharge Pure Electric P8 is capable of a travelling more than 249 miles on a single charge, and can be charged to 80% of its battery capacity in as little as 40 minutes using a fast charger. Being an electric car, it will deliver significant savings to owners in running costs, as well as tax benefits.

Inside, the car benefits from the company’s brand-new infotainment system powered by Google Android, as well as taking the XC40’s already renowned use of interior space even further.

Kristian Elvefors, Volvo Car UK’s Managing Director, said: “For Volvo Cars, the future is electric. The battery-powered XC40 spearheads our ambitious sustainability strategy, while bringing the huge benefits of electric driving – and more – to an already award-winning package.”

A milestone in one of the automotive industry’s boldest electrification strategies

Volvo’s first entrant into the compact premium SUV segment when it was launched in 2018, the XC40 has seen unprecedented success, winning a host of prestigious awards – including European Car of the Year in 2018 – and quickly becoming the firm’s best-selling model in the UK. The Recharge Pure Electric variant comes at the perfect time, with almost three quarters of consumers considering an all-electric car for their next purchase1.

The fully electric XC40 SUV – Volvo’s first electric car and one of the safest on the road

The XC40 Recharge Pure Electric marks a major milestone in Volvo Cars’ electrification strategy, which is one of the boldest from any traditional car maker. As part of a long-term ambition to be climate-neutral by 2040, the company aims to reduce tailpipe emissions by 50% per car, and for half of all new vehicles it sells globally to be pure electric, by 2025.

The all-electric XC40 also expands Volvo’s already comprehensive range of plug-in vehicles, now sold under the Recharge brand, with customers already able to purchase a plug-in hybrid version of every model in the Volvo range.

Volvo XC40 Recharge Plug-in Hybrid

While the recently launched plug-in hybrid XC40 is ideal for those making the transition to electric driving – its 28-mile electric range is backed up by a petrol engine for greater distances – the Pure Electric is the perfect car for those ready to commit to all-electric motoring. The average distance driven each day by UK motorists is 30 miles2, so its 249-plus-mile range more than covers most people’s daily requirements – especially if home or workplace charging is installed meaning a full charge at the start of each journey.

The XC40 P8’s long range does not come at the expense of performance, with its twin electric motors producing 408hp to deliver a 0-62mph time of only 4.9 seconds.

Interior design: making clever even cleverer

While the XC40 already follows the principle of doing more with less, the Recharge Pure Electric version takes this even further. The lack of an internal combustion engine frees up space for an additional 30-litre storage compartment or ‘frunk’ under the front bonnet, while the placement of the batteries under the centre of the car means space is not compromised elsewhere.

Volvo XC40 Recharge Plug-in Hybrid

As with any other XC40, the battery-powered version comes equipped with clever interior touches such as a removable waste bin, a fold-out hook in the glove compartment for bags, and a useful boot divider complete with hooks for keeping shopping bags separate and upright. A pair of sizeable front door bins come courtesy of the traditionally door-housed speakers being moved to the base of the windscreen.

The interior of the battery-powered XC40 also carries over the strong focus on sustainability from other variants, with the door linings and carpets made from 97% recycled plastic bottles.

Rethinking infotainment

The all-electric XC40 marks the debut of Volvo Cars’ brand-new Android-powered infotainment system, which gives customers unprecedented personalisation increased intuitiveness and new embedded Google technologies and services.

Total integration of Android Automotive OS, Google’s open-source Android platform, means services such as Google Maps, Google Assistant and other automotive apps will be built in.

For the first time on a Volvo car, software and operating system updates will be available over the air, meaning an XC40 Recharge Pure Electric will improve over its lifetime rather than being at its peak on leaving the factory.

One of the safest cars on the road

In spite of the challenges presented by the lack of an internal combustion engine, the electric XC40 is one of the safest cars on the market. Volvo Cars’ safety engineers have totally redeveloped the frontal crash structure, while introducing a new and unique safety structure for the passengers and battery – helping to keep occupants as safe as they are in any other Volvo.

The fully electric XC40 SUV – Volvo’s first electric car and one of the safest on the road

The XC40 Recharge Pure Electric is also the first Volvo to feature a new version of Pilot Assist, the driver-assistance technology that deploys steering, acceleration and braking support to help take the strain during long motorway journeys and sitting in traffic. The system now uses Google Maps for information such as speed limits and curves in the road to improve its functionality.

A new Emergency Stop Assist function is now included, meaning that if the driver is not holding the steering wheel while Pilot Assist is activated, the driver will be warned in different stages until the vehicle is brought to a safe stop.

(Source: Volvo Media)

Sony EV

The Japanese electronics company Sony has developed an electric car. The prototype, named the “Vision-S”, was presented by the company at CES in Las Vegas. Sony announced that it wants to “contribute to the achievement of safe, reliable, and comfortable mobility experiences”.

According to media information, the electric vehicle was developed jointly with the Austrian contract manufacturer and supplier Magna Steyr. Bosch, Continental and ZF were apparently also involved.

The prototype features Sony’s software, image and sensor technology. A total of 33 sensors – including CMOS image sensors and ToF sensors – are embedded in the car to recognise people and objects inside and outside the vehicle. They are intended to provide a “safety cocoon” to protect people both inside and outside. The “360 Reality Audio” system is used to create an excellent sound experience within the vehicle. For this purpose, loudspeakers are built into each seat and surround the passengers with sound. Opposite the front seats is a panoramic screen, where passengers can access content via an intuitive user interface.

(Source: https://www.springerprofessional.de/en/battery/companies—institutions/sony-reveals-its-own-electric-car-at-ces-2020/17553250)

48V Technology in the Kia

The powertrain combines a 48V system with a diesel engine. The first mild hybrid diesel will be the Kia Sportage compact SUV, and then in 2019, in the Kia cee’d.

The 48V system of the Kia mild hybrid powertrain consists of a belt-integrated starter generator, a DC/DC converter for connecting the 48 and 12V systems, and a lithium-ion battery. This has a capacity of 0.46 kWh. Kia state that, in the new WLTP (Worldwide harmonized Light vehicles Test Procedure), the 48V system emits up to 4% less CO2.

48V Hybrid (Source: Kia)

The starter generator can produce up to 10kW of power, and provides additional torque during acceleration, taking some of the load off the diesel engine. In regeneration mode, energy is saved while braking, driving downhill and coasting. Kia is able to combine the mild hybrid system with both manual and automatic gearboxes, and with front, rear and all-wheel drive. In future, Kia state that 48V systemswill also be available with petrol engines.

Axial-flux EV motor technology

YASA P400 series electric motors and generators are small and light, capable of delivering up to 370 N·m of torque and 160 kW of power from an axial length of 80.4 mm.

Motor developments for electric vehicles (EVs) often are shaded by the emphasis placed on battery capability. But the enduring need to deliver improved packaging, power, torque and range from EVs brings significant opportunity for new approaches to motor design and production.

More information on the SAE website:

https://www.sae.org/news/2018/02/yasa02-18?eid=332752393&bid=2098042

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PTC Heater

BorgWarner has announced that it will supply its high-voltage positive temperature coefficient (PTC) cabin heating technology for an unspecified new EV model from a global automaker.

BorgWarner’s technology is designed to provide rapid cabin heating while making the most efficient possible use of energy in order to conserve battery power.

Unlike legacy vehicles, EVs don’t generate a significant source of waste heat that can be used to heat the cabin. BorgWarner’s high-voltage cabin heater relies on ceramic PTC components to warm the air stream coming from the blower. It self-regulates to ensure that high-power heating is available in cold temperatures, when it is needed most. As temperatures rise and heating demand decreases, the energy level is automatically reduced.

The heater offers up to 7 kW of power, provides dual-zone functionality for increased efficiency, and boasts nearly silent operation.

Source: BorgWarner

48V Hybrid Battery

Press release from Bosch:

Bosch’s new 48-volt battery for hybrids is in demand by automakers across the globe. Similar to the Bosch e-axle, this innovative 48-volt battery is standardized for easy integration into new vehicle models. Established manufacturers and start-ups alike can thus eliminate long and expensive development processes. “Bosch is an incubator of electromobility. We help manufacturers reduce their development times and launch their products faster,” says Dr. Rolf Bulander, chairman of the Bosch Mobility Solutions business sector and member of the board of management of Robert Bosch GmbH. This means that installation of the lithium-ion battery will benefit not only compact cars, but mini- and microcars as well. Production of the battery is scheduled to start in late 2018. Anticipating a large market for entry-level hybrids, Bosch offers other powertrain components for these models in addition to the 48-volt battery. The company estimates that some 15 million 48-volt hybrid vehicles will be on the road by 2025.


 

Automakers everywhere – whether in China, Europe, or North America – are all striving to cut CO2 emissions, which in practice means reducing cars’ fuel consumption. Bosch has systematically designed its new 48-volt battery to do precisely that. For instance, the lithium-ion cells Bosch uses are as compact as possible while still achieving a reduction in CO2. The 48-volt battery is in high demand, particularly among Chinese manufacturers, and the lithium-ion unit is poised to become a global success. Bosch is already in talks with over a dozen customers and has secured a considerable number of production projects.

The secret of the battery’s success is its sophisticated concept, which offers a comparatively inexpensive way to help reduce vehicle CO2 emissions. This is also due to the product design, as the battery requires no active cooling and its housing is made of plastic, not metal. Both these factors bring costs down still further. The plastic housing presents a real challenge, as lithium-ion cells expand when the battery is charging and over the course of the unit’s service life. As a result, the housing must withstand a certain amount of stress. Bosch engineers rearranged the cells in the 48-volt battery so that even plastic housing can bear the pressure.

With its new battery, Bosch is playing a key role in making the 48-volt hybrid affordable for the mass market.

Wireless electric car charging testing using a Renault Kangoo Z.E.

It’s long been an inspiring futuristic concept: electric cars that can recharge continuously at speed, driving along roadways with built-in inductive charging.

Think a modern-day version of slot cars, but at 1:1 scale.

Now French automaker Renault has demonstrated a prototype of just such a system, briefly recharging one of its electric cars at 60 miles per hour.

The French automaker that builds more electric cars than any other European maker partnered with electronics company Qualcomm to develop what it calls a “dynamic wireless electric-vehicle charging” system.

The prototype demonstrated last week allowed charging at up to 20 kilowatts at speeds up to 100 km/h (62 mph) and higher.

The demonstration cars were a pair of Renault Kangoo ZE electric small delivery vans, shown on a test track in Versailles, near Paris.

Qualcomm and a French firm, Vedecom, installed the charging equipment in the test track.

Renault, meanwhile, modified its electric vans with the system that permitted wireless charging.

The goal of the tests, the companies said, is to assess the “operation and efficiency of energy transfer to the vehicles for a wide range of practical scenarios.”

Among the communications between vehicle and track are those that identify the vehicle and authorize it to begin charging, negotiate over the level of power to be provided, and keep the vehicle aligned on the charging strip at an appropriate speed.

The test is part of a 9-million-euro project known as Fabric, partly funded by the European Union, to evaluate the technology feasibility, business models, and sustainability of wireless on-road charging.

Fabric began in January 2014, and will continue through the end of this year; it’s made up of 25 partners from nine European countries.